Author Archives: Built Environment and Health

Neighborhood Physical Disorder and Physical Activity Among Older Adults in NYC

Through the years, we have done a fair amount of work to collect and validate measures of neighborhood physical disorder – urban deterioration – using our CANVAS/Google Street View system. Neighborhood disorder is controversial construct and measure, not only because … Continue reading

Posted in Active Transport, Adults, Aesthetics, CANVAS, Physical Activity, Physical Disorder, Street View | Leave a comment

Commandments for Variable Naming and Data Management

As we launched another multifaceted geographic data linkage study our multi-institution team, that includes researchers at Drexel University, Columbia University and the University of Washington, has developed a set of commandments to streamline and harmonize our data management, variable naming … Continue reading

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JAMA on Walking and Walkability

Following up on its two recent articles about neighborhood walkability, including an editorial co-authored by Andrew Rundle, JAMA today published a Medical News and Perspectives article entitled “As Walking Movement Grows, Neighborhood Walkability Gains Attention”.  The article notes the various … Continue reading

Posted in Physical Activity, Walkability | Leave a comment

Steve Mooney receives Poster Award at Epidemiology Congress of the Americas 2016

Steve Mooney, a recently minted PhD who did his doctoral work with the BEH group, won a best poster presentation award at the 2016 Epidemiology Congress of the Americas for his work on the Neighborhood Environment-Wide Association Study design. Dr. … Continue reading

Posted in Methods, Physical Activity, Social Determinants, Urban Design | Leave a comment

Urban Design to Support Walking and Health

JAMA just published an editorial co-written by, Andrew Rundle, entitled “Can Walkable Urban Design Play a Role in Reducing the Incidence of Obesity-Related Conditions?”.  The editorial provides a perspective on a study published in JAMA by Creatore et al., that … Continue reading

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Can Big Data get us Better Estimates of Neighborhood Disorder?

At the Built Environment and Health group, we try hard to measure neighborhood characteristics accurately. We systematically audit Street View imagery, we use LiDAR scans to assess tree canopy, and we use business registration records to profile neighborhood retail. A … Continue reading

Posted in Methods, Physical Disorder, Street View | Leave a comment

Maintaining Human Subject’s Protections in Neighborhood Health Effects Research

We recently published a commentary in the American Journal of Public Health describing the concerns we have for protecting study subject anonymity with the use of online geographic and data tools in neighborhood health effects research.  Examples of neighborhood data available … Continue reading

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Measuring Pedestrian Activity Using GPS Logger Data

It has been suggested that GPS monitoring data can be used to estimate distances traveled and speeds of travel during active and non-active travel journeys and, that when combined with accelerometer monitoring, GPS data can be used to identify travel … Continue reading

Posted in Active Transport, GPS, Physical Activity | Leave a comment

Maps of Neighborhood Physical Disorder

The Journal of Maps recently published our article showing a high resolution map of neighborhood physical disorder in New York City. Physical disorder – the deterioration of urban spaces owing to social forces favoring neglect and abandonment – has long been … Continue reading

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Our Pedestrian Injury Research gets Further Coverage.

The Mailman School blog reached out to Steve Mooney to discuss our research on pedestrian injuries.  The post shows a series of Street Views of the key features that were associated with injuries.  The article is Here. And an article … Continue reading

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